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Diversity and Difference

Diversity and Difference

The Dean of Students Office Recognizes Important Events in March

March 4th
Fat Tuesday/Mardi Gras

A Christian holiday and popular cultural phenomenon, Mardi Gras dates back thousands of years to pagan spring and fertility rites. Also known as Carnival, it is celebrated in many countries around the world. According to historians, Mardi Gras dates back thousands of years to pagan celebrations of spring and fertility. When Christianity arrived in Rome, religious leaders decided to incorporate these popular local traditions into the new faith, an easier task than abolishing them altogether.As a result, the excess and debauchery of the Mardi Gras season became a prelude to Lent, the 40 days of penance between Ash Wednesday and Easter Sunday.

Many historians believe that the first American Mardi Gras took place on March 3, 1699, when the French explorers Iberville and Bienville landed in what is now Louisiana, just south of New Orleans. They held a small celebration and dubbed the spot Point du Mardi Gras. Years later, New Orleans and other French settlements began marking the holiday with street parties, masked balls and lavish dinners. When the Spanish took control of New Orleans, however, they abolished these rituals, and the bans remained in force until Louisiana became a U.S. state in 1812.

On Mardi Gras in 1827, a group of students donned colorful costumes and danced through the streets of New Orleans, emulating the revelry they'd observed while visiting Paris. Ten years later, the first recorded New Orleans Mardi Gras parade took place, a tradition that continues to this day. In 1857, a secret society of New Orleans businessmen called the "Mistick Krewe of Comus" organized a torch-lit Mardi Gras procession with marching bands and rolling floats, setting the tone for future public celebrations in the city. Since then, krewes have remained a fixture of the Carnival scene throughout Louisiana. Other lasting customs include throwing beads and other trinkets, wearing masks, decorating floats and eating King Cake.

Louisiana is the only state in which Mardi Gras is a legal holiday. However, elaborate carnival festivities draw crowds in other parts of the United States during the Mardi Gras season as well, including Alabama and Mississippi. Each region has its own events and traditions.

Top 10 Mardi Gras Traditions
Source: www.history.com/topics/holidays/mardi-gras

March 5th
Ash Wednesday; Lent Begins (Christian)

Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent in the Western Christian calendar, directly following Shrove Tuesday. According to the canonical gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, Jesus Christ spent 40 days fasting in the desert, where he endured temptation by Satan. Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of this 40-day liturgical period of prayer, fasting, and almsgiving.

Ash Wednesday derives its name from the practice of placing ashes (formally called The Imposition of Ashes) on the foreheads of adherents as a celebration and reminder of human mortality, and as a sign of mourning and repentance to God. The ashes used are typically gathered from the burning of the palms from the previous year's Palm Sunday. Today, Ash Wednesday is observed by many Christian denominations, including Catholics, Lutherans, Methodists, Anglicans, and Presbyterians, among many others.

March 8th
International Women's Day

Each year International Women's Day (IWD) is celebrated on March 8. The first International Women's Day was held in 1911. Thousands of events occur to mark the economic, political and social achievements of women. Women's equality has made positive gains but the world is still unequal. International Women's Day celebrates the social, political and economic achievements of women while focusing world attention on areas requiring further action.

Inspiring Change is the 2014 theme. It calls for challenging the status quo for women's equality and vigilance inspiring positive change. The vast array of communication channels, supportive spokespeople, equality research, campaigns and corporate responsibility initiatives means everyone can be an advocate inspiring change for women's advancement.

International Women's Day is a time to reflect on progress made, to call for change and to celebrate acts of courage and determination by ordinary women who have played an extraordinary role in the history of their countries and communities.

With the 2015 deadline to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) around the corner, International Women's Day is also an opportunity to review the challenges and achievements in the MDG implementation for women and girls, as the Commission on the Status of Women will be doing from 10 to 21 March 2014.

Source: www.internationalwomensday.com

March 16th
Purim (Judaism)

Purim is celebrated with a public reading, usually in the synagogue, of the Book of Esther (Megillah Esther), which tells the story of the holiday. It is read aloud on Purim and tells the story of Esther, a Jewish Queen of Persia. She was married to the king of Persia, who was unaware of her religious background. Sometime around the year 357 BCE, the prime minister of Persia, Haman, and his wife plotted to kill all Jewish people in the Persian Empire.

Esther heard of this plan and warned the king, risking her own safety. Haman and his sons were executed and the Jews were ordered to defend themselves against those who threatened them. This resulted in bloody battles, in which many people were killed. Purim celebrates the end of these battles.

Over the centuries, Haman became the embodiment of every anti-Semite in every land where Jews were oppressed. The significance of Purim lies in how it began, but also in what it has become: a thankful and joyous affirmation of Jewish survival against all odds.

March 17th
St. Patrick's Day (Christianity)

What began as a religious feast day for the patron saint of Ireland has become an international festival celebrating Irish culture with parades, dancing, special foods and a whole lot of green.

It is known that St. Patrick was born in Britain to wealthy parents near the end of the fourth century. He is believed to have died on March 17, around 460 A.D. Although his father was a Christian deacon, it has been suggested that he probably took on the role because of tax incentives and there is no evidence that Patrick came from a particularly religious family. At the age of 16, Patrick was taken prisoner by a group of Irish raiders who were attacking his family's estate. They transported him to Ireland where he spent six years in captivity. Although many believe he was taken to live in Mount Slemish in County Antrim, it is more likely that he was held in County Mayo near Killala.) During this time, he worked as a shepherd, outdoors and away from people. Lonely and afraid, he turned to his religion for solace, becoming a devout Christian. (It is also believed that Patrick first began to dream of converting the Irish people to Christianity during his captivity.)

Hola Mohalla (Sikh)

Hola Mahalla is a Sikh festival which begins on the first day of the lunar month of Chet in the Nanakshahi calendar Hola Mohalla is an annual Sikh festival, celebrated extensively over three days mainly at the Anandpur Sahib Gurudwara, in the state of Punjab. It is a martial fair that was introduced by Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh, to fortify the Sikh community by carrying out martial training and mock-drills, along with religious discussions.

The event was originated by Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Sikh Guru.The Guru was in the midst of fighting both Aurangzeb of the Mughal Empire and the Hill Rajputs, and had recently established the Khalsa Panth. On February 22, 1701, Guru Gobind Singh started a new tradition by overseeing a day of mock battles and poetry contests at Holgarh Fort. The tradition has since spread from the town of Anandpur Sahib to nearby Kiratpur Sahib and the foothills of the Shivaliks, and to other Gurdwaras around the world.

March 20th
Spring Equinox

The word equinox is derived from the Latin words meaning "equal night." At the equinoxes, the tilt of Earth relative to the Sun is zero, which means that Earth's axis neither points toward nor away from the Sun. On the equinox, night and day are nearly exactly the same length – 12 hours – all over the world. However, even if this is widely accepted, it isn't entirely true. In reality equinoxes don't have exactly 12 hours of daylight.

The March equinox occurs the moment the sun crosses the celestial equator – the imaginary line in the sky above the Earth's equator – from south to north. This happens either on March 19, 20 or 21 every year. On any other day of the year, the Earth's axis tilts a little away from or towards the Sun.

In the northern hemisphere the March equinox marks the start of spring and has long been celebrated as a time of rebirth. Many cultures and religions celebrate or observe holidays and festivals around the March equinox, like the Easter and Passover.

Equinoxes, along with solstices, have been celebrated in cultures all over the world for as long as we have written history. One of the most famous ancient Spring equinox celebrations was the Mayan sacrificial ritual by the main pyramid in Chichen Itza, Mexico.

Spring Equinox Around the World: Traditions

International Day of Happiness

The General Assembly of the United Nations in its resolution on July 12, 2012 proclaimed March 20th the International Day of Happiness recognizing the relevance of happiness and well-being as universal goals and aspirations in the lives of human beings around the world and the importance of their recognition in public policy objectives.

By designating a special day for happiness, the UN aims to focus world attention on the idea that economic growth must be inclusive, equitable, and balanced, such that it promotes sustainable development, and alleviates poverty. Additionally the UN acknowledges that in order to attain global happiness, economic development must be accompanied by social and environmental well being.

The initiative to declare a day of happiness came from Bhutan – a country whose citizens are considered to be some of the happiest people in the world. The Himalayan Kingdom has championed an alternative measure of national and societal prosperity, called the Gross National Happiness Index (GNH). The GNH rejects the sole use of economic and material wealth as an indicator of development, and instead adopts a more holistic outlook, where spiritual well being of citizens and communities is given as much importance as their material well being.

"Happiness and Well-being: Defining a New Economic Paradigm"
Source www.timeanddate.com/holidays/un/happiness-day
Source www.un.org/en/events/happinessday/

Persian or Iranian New Year

In harmony with the rebirth of nature, the Iranian New Year Celebration, or NowRuz (meaning the new day), always begins on the first day of spring. Nowruz ceremonies are symbolic representations of two ancient concepts -the End and the Rebirth; or Good and Evil. A few weeks before the New Year, Iranians clean and rearrange their homes. They make new clothes, bake pastries and germinate seeds as sign of renewal. The ceremonial cloth is set up in each household. Troubadours, referred to as Haji Firuz, disguise themselves with makeup and wear brightly colored outfits of satin. These Haji Firuz, singing and dancing, parade as a carnival through the streets with tambourines, kettle drums, and trumpets to spread good cheer and the news of the coming new year.

NowRuz Traditions
Source www.farsinet.com/norooz/

March 21st
International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is observed annually. On this day, in 1960, police opened fire and killed 69 people at a peaceful demonstration in Sharpeville, South Africa, against the apartheid "pass laws". Proclaiming the Day in 1966, the General Assembly called on the international community to redouble its efforts to eliminate all forms of racial discrimination (resolution 2142 (XXI)).

In 1979, the General Assembly adopted a Programme of activities to be undertaken during the second half of the Decade for Action to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination. On that occasion, the General Assembly decided that a week of solidarity with the people struggling against racism and racial discrimination, beginning on 21st of March, would be organized annually in all States.

Since then, the apartheid system in South Africa has been dismantled. Racist laws and practices have been abolished in many countries, and an international framework for fighting racism, guided by the International Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, has been built.

Racial and ethnic discrimination occur on a daily basis, hindering progress for millions of people around the world. Racism and intolerance can take various form, all of which can destroy lives and fracture communities. The struggle against racism is a matter of priority for the international community and is at the heart of the work of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

The United Nations has been concerned with this issue since its foundation and the prohibition of racial discrimination is enshrined in all core international human rights instruments. It places obligations on States and tasks them with eradicating discrimination in the public and private spheres. The principle of equality also requires States to adopt special measures to eliminate conditions that cause or help to perpetuate racial discrimination.

World Poetry Day

Poetry contributes to creative diversity, by questioning anew our use of words and things, our modes of perception and understanding of the world. Through its associations, its metaphors and its own grammar, poetic language is thus conceivably another facet of the dialogue among cultures. Diversity in dialogue, free flow of ideas by word, creativity and innovation. World Poetry Day is an invitation to reflect on the power of language and the full development of each person's creative abilities.

World Poetry Day aims to support linguistic diversity through poetic expression and to offer endangered languages the opportunity to be heard within their communities. Moreover, this day is meant to support a return to the oral tradition of poetry recitals, promote teaching poetry, restore a dialogue between poetry and the other arts, support small publishers and create an image of poetry in the media so that the art of poetry will no longer be considered an outdated form of art.

March 24th
International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of the Transatlantic Slave Trade

For over 400 years, more than 15 million men, women and children were the victims of the tragic transatlantic slave trade. Every year on March 25th, the International Day of Remembrance for the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade offers the opportunity to honour and remember those who suffered and died at the hands of the brutal slavery system. The International Day also aims at raising awareness about the dangers of racism and prejudice today.

This year's theme, "Victory over Slavery: Haiti and Beyond" pays tribute to the fight against slavery in nations around the world. Haiti was the first nation to become independent as a result of the struggle of enslaved men and women led by Toussaint Louverture. 2014 marks 210 years since the Republic of Haiti was established on January 1, 1804.

UNESCO Slave Route Project

"Ignorance or concealment of major historical events constitutes an obstacle to mutual understanding, reconciliation and cooperation among peoples. UNESCO has thus decided to break the silence surrounding the slave trade and slavery that have affected all continents and have caused the great upheavals that have shaped our modern societies."

Events www.un.org/en/events/slaveryremembranceday/2014/events.shtml
Source www.un.org/en/events/slaveryremembranceday/

March 31st
Ugadi (Hindu)

Ugadi, also known as Ougadi or Telugu New Year, is a Hindu festival celebrated in some Hindu majority countries such as India and Mauritius. The festival is celebrated on around March every year to commemorate the day when Lord Brahma began his auspicious creation and the day when Krishna, the avatar of Lord Vishnu, died in 3101 BC. Usually, Ugadi is celebrated on between March and April.

The word Ugadi is derived from "Yuga" (meaning beginning) and "Adi" (meaning era). According to Hindu beliefs, Ougadi was the day when Lord Brahma created the universe and its whole content. It is also believed that Krishna, the complete incarnation of Hindu God, Vishnu, died on Ougadi in 3101 BC.

People celebrate Ugadi by visiting their families, relatives, or neighbors and have lunch or dinner together. Therefore, there is a tradition to clean the house and buy new clothes before celebrating Ugadi. In this case, both people and the houses will be in their best state when the relatives and neighbors come to visit.

During Ougadi, people also take a ritual bath, pray for good health and good luck, as well as decorate the house with mango leaves and rangolis in the hope that they will get a better life in the upcoming year. In the evening, people also visit the temples to attend religious gatherings and listen to the predictions for the coming year.

César Chåvez Day

Cesar E. Chavez National Holiday was established by Los Angeles volunteers who organized and led the effort in California that won Cesar Chavez Day, the first legal state holiday and day of service and learning in honor of farm worker leader Cesar E. Chavez.

César Chávez was born on March 31 in 1927. He was a migrant farm worker from the age of 10. He became active with the Community Service Organization, which helped fight racial and economic discrimination against Chicano residents.

Dr Chávez co-founded the National Farm Workers Association in the early 1960s. He focused attention on the plight of migrant farm workers and gained support to have his organization be the first successful farm workers' union in the United States. He used principles of non-violence, with strikes and boycotts. Dr Chávez remained president of United Farm Workers of America (AFL-CIO) until his death on April 23, 1993.

Cesar Chavez gave our nation and each of us a unique example to live our lives by. His selfless dedication for farm worker and worker rights, economic justice, civil rights, environmental justice, peace, nonviolence, empowerment of the poor and disenfranchised, is a monumental legacy that will inspire all and the generations to come.

"There's no turning back...We will win. We are winning because ours is a revolution of mind and heart."....

Cesar Chavez Cesar E. Chavez, the Farm Worker Leader, Honores with a California Legal Holiday
Source www.cesarchavezholiday.org
Source www.timeanddate.com/holidays/us/cesar-chavez-day

Contact Information

If you would like to be included in future profiles on this site, please contact Josh Cooper at josh_cooper@mspp.edu.

Updated 4/15/14

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National Coming Out Day, October 11

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Recognizing our Military Community

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National Coming Out Day, October 11
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June 2012
Pride Month and Haitian Flag Day

February 2012
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November 2011
Recognizing our Military Community

September 2011
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March 2011
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Happy New Year!

November 2010
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October 2010
National Coming Out Day, October 11

September 2010
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June 2010
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May 2010
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March 2010
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February 2010
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November 2009
The Office of Multicultural Affairs recognizes our student veterans and military during the month of November

October 2009
National Coming Out Day: October 11th and Disability Awareness Month: October

September 2009
Hispanic Heritage Month

The Changing Face of Immigration: Legal Debates, Controversies and the Implications for Clinical Practice (PDF)

May 2009
Weil Grant Training: Leading Culturally Sensitive Parent Education Support Group

April 2009
Latino Mental Health Professional Networking Evening

Diversity Training: Hurricane Katrina Disaster Victims

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